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balaseven
balaseven • Apr 21, 2008

Clock Signals

Hi folks,

Can anybody please tel me the exact use of clock signals?


Thanks
BS
vissin
vissin • Apr 21, 2008
In the most basic sense the clock signals are used for timing.

Eg. inside a microcomputer it is used to time instruction execution cycle.

Another eg., in serial communication, it is used to synchronize the timings of two communicating devices.

Ask, and be more up to the point with your question, if you need any more.
balaseven
balaseven • Apr 22, 2008
Hi vissin,

Thank u for ur respond.I already know the above explanation.I want clear example and explanation. I searched the web,unable to get it......do u know any link...pls post it here..

Thanks
BS
hi dude,all things are measured in time,since man is too lazy to do all things he want someone to do his task,he opted the machines to do,tats why we require clock
Haha! Yes, I believe if it weren't for laziness, man could have computed 500 trillion floating-point operations per second by himself.. *ponders*

😉
vissin
vissin • Apr 25, 2008
balaseven
Hi vissin,

Thank u for ur respond.I already know the above explanation.I want clear example and explanation. I searched the web,unable to get it......do u know any link...pls post it here..

Thanks
BS
Clock signal by itself won't make any chapter in any general book of electronics, being a tool used in many ways and in many systems. Still, if I must give you any tip I'd name the following that may aid your understanding:


Get your hands on application notes or datasheets of any I2C or SPI device or just plainly read it's theory of operation.

Maybe you'll also find something if you search the 8051 bible at 8052.com
Muffy
Muffy • May 26, 2008
Perhaps the use of an anlalogy and some immagination would help you better understand the use of a clock pulse.

Imagine your mother has given you a list of instructions.
1. Pick up groceries from the supermarket
2. Pick up the laundry from the dry cleaners
3. Buy diapers for your baby brother
4. Call the refrigerator service men
.
.
.
99. Bury your dead cat.

Now if you were unorganized this list would overwhelm you (analogous to a microcontroller without clock trying to execute all instructions at the same time). But fortunately you aren't.So what do you do? You set out to make a timetable.
You allot each chore a specific time of your day, eg do task 1. at 8:00 , do task 2. at 8:30 do task 3. at 9:30 .... etc.

Thus what you are effectively doing is spacing out your instructions over periodic intervals. because all instructions cannot be executed at the same time!!

Now imagine you are a microcontroller ,you dont know how to read the time
You can only count the number of transitions from low voltage to high voltage ( positive edge of a clock pulse) .So now this is how you would organise your chores

Carry out instruction 1 after 10 transitions
Carry out instruction 2 after 20 transitions
.
.
Carry out instruction 99 after 10000 transitions

So essentially the microcontroller uses the clock to time the execution of instructions

I have used a microcontroller as an example here but in essence a clock pulse can be used in any sequential circuits.

Hope this helps .
Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • May 26, 2008
Hey, that's a nice answer, Muffy! 😀 I liked the way you explained it!

Keep up the good work!
balaseven
balaseven • May 29, 2008
Hi ,Muffy.

Thanks a lot.....I really glad with your answer.....thank you very much...............
Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • May 29, 2008
ash
Haha! Yes, I believe if it weren't for laziness, man could have computed 500 trillion floating-point operations per second by himself.. *ponders*

😉
[Note: Since the thread initiator is happy with the answer, extending this discussion a little further won't hurt 😉 ]

I bet the human brain does more calculations than that 😁! The data might not confirm this. Just take a simple example of capturing, analyzing & making sense of the light rays that enter our eyes every second. Today, even the most modern GPUs aren't capable of producing photo-realistic images. What's taking man years to achieve has already been achieved inside human body, you see! 😒

Sorry, if I'm going bit off-side.
elric
elric • Jun 14, 2008
Nice answer Muffy wish my teachers explained stuff with such analogies 😁

Hey Big_K, our brain is a parallel computing neural system which is totally different from the sillicon based gpu's, so there is no point to compare the throughput of these two systems 😛
Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • Jun 14, 2008
elric
Nice answer Muffy wish my teachers explained stuff with such analogies 😁

Hey Big_K, our brain is a parallel computing neural system which is totally different from the sillicon based gpu's, so there is no point to compare the throughput of these two systems 😛
I'm not comparing the two (is there any comparison?) . Just that the ultimate achievement in GPUs will be something that will create an illusion of reality. 😲

Probably we should discuss this in a separate thread!
elric
elric • Jun 14, 2008
Umm. When you are said "Today, even the most modern GPUs aren't capable of producing photo-realistic images." i thought you were making a comparison of the two systems, and said one was inferior (and i agree it is).
Also what is reality? its just a few pulses thats flowing through our brain 😛. Just kidding, dont want to get philosophical.

PS: Photo-realistic is something our human brain perceives so hence i took your statement for a comparison
Hey are you Ok guys !!!...you all are comparing human-brain with Machine!!!well I am desperately eager to meet my humanoid!!!

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