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Volkswagen To Bring Cylinder Deactivation Technology In Engines

Question asked by Farjand in #Coffee Room on Sep 4, 2011
Farjand
Farjand · Sep 4, 2011
Rank C2 - EXPERT
This month we have seen an introduction of various modifications in automotive technology. Volkswagen has been on the forefront of these innovations. We have seen this in the present months Frankfurt auto show. The automaker is now planning to roll out cylinder deactivation technology similar to Mercedes Benz who had earlier shown that the technology can be employed in cars. However we still don't know when it will be possible.
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The car maker Volkswagen will now, implement this technology in its latest 1.4 liter turbocharged engine. The plan is to reduce the fuel consumption in its cars. This will be done when the vehicle is running idle or if the car is steady and no work output from the engine is being utilized. The technology as its name goes revolves around the concept of deactivating or shutting off the cylinders which would otherwise keep on running and waste fuel.

In the actual cylinder deactivation, a constant monitoring of the accelerator is done. A pattern of driving is noted and corresponding information is sent to the engine. If the pattern is uneven or found to be below a certain minimum speed level then two of the four cylinders will stop working. As per the company's estimates, around one liter of fuel can be saved per 100 Kilometers of journey when the automobile is travelling at 31 Mph.

Once the cylinders are shut off, they can again be activated by pressing the accelerator pedal. The cylinders which are made inactive initially start working when the engine speed is between 1400 to 4000 RPM and developing a torque of 25 to 75 NM.

This technology is completely different from the Volvo's KERS. KERS involves the use of flywheels. While Cylinder deactivation is completely different phenomenon. Although the ultimate aim of both the technologies is the same. Let us wait till we get updates from the automaker. Posted in: #Coffee Room

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