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Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • Jun 1, 2010

LiquidWeb's Storm On Demand Declared Top Performing Cloud Platform

LANSING, Mich.— Cloud Computing analyst, www.CloudHarmony.com, performed a comprehensive analysis of twenty (20) Cloud Computing Vendors CPU performance. Cloud Harmony benchmarked more than 150 different cloud server configurations focusing this round of testing specifically on raw CPU performance. After exhaustive analysis, Cloud Harmony determined Storm On Demand's 48GB Cloud Server to be the top performer out of all benchmarked server configurations. (https://StormOnDemand.com)


When compared to Amazon EC2's highest performing server, Storm On Demand is 57% faster and at nearly half of the cost!


Cloud Harmony results:

  • Storm On Demand "by far the most diverse heterogeneous infrastructure."
  • "Storm's 48GB cloud server was the top performer out of all of our benchmarked servers with 42.5 CCUs and a Geekbench score of 13020! This is most likely due to the very new and extremely fast Xeon X5650 "Westmere" hardware it runs on."
  • "The Intel i5 CPUs also performed very well with our CPU benchmarks and provide an excellent performance to price ratio (26.5 CCUs for $0.171/hr)!"
Benchmark Methodology Used by Cloud Harmony:
Most IaaS/server clouds are based on hypervisor/virtualization technology and running in multi-tenant environments (multiple virtual servers running on a single physical host). Different hypervisors support different methods of CPU allocation/sharing including fixed/weighted, burstable, and others. Because of this, it is difficult to compare CPU performance in different clouds. Vendors often use different terminology to define cloud server CPUs including ECU (EC2), VPU (vCloud), GHz (KVM), CPUs, Cores, and more. Many provide an approximation of how that terminology relates to physical resources (e.g. 1 ECU = 1.0-1.2 GHz 2007 Xeon), but this is generally not sufficient for an objective comparison of providers.​
Source:
CloudHarmony Blog: What is an ECU? CPU Benchmarking in the Cloud

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