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CE Designer
CE Designer • Sep 11, 2012

Do managers get enough credit?

Recently at my work I have been put in positions where I have to act as a manager. I've been addressing safety issues and mediating employee disputes. I have come to realize that it is not so easy as people think it is. Here in my country (Trinidad) people have the mentality that managers have an easy work sitting in an office all day. I have also come to realize that people who say this usually dont know what its really like. It takes a mental toll on a person. The responsibility of everything and everyone falls on you. Everyone depends on you to make decisive decisions. The pressure comes where you feel that you must make the right decision every time. Dealing with grown men and women can be very stressful, especially those who resist authority.
Don't get me wrong, I am glad to be exposed to all of these scenarios. I am learning alot, and there is much more to learn. I am becoming a better person and stronger CEan.
My boss told me once, Manage with an iron fist in a velvet glove. That is to be strong, assertive and confident in what you say, but at the same time be polite about it. I always remember that when dealing with disputes.
zaveri
zaveri • Sep 11, 2012
There is a quote from a Shakespeare's play:

"uneasy is the head which wears the crown".

Similarly, i bet with higher positions (such as that of a manager or project leader), comes high responsibilities and pressures.
Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • Sep 11, 2012
I know what you're saying. The biggest problems in management is 'people management' and you've to really get along with different types of peoples to get the work done or have a teach achieve a goal. It's *VERY* difficult. I realise this more as an entrepreneur than as an employee where I managed a very small team.

To answer your question: I think managers don't get the credit they deserve. But that only applies to good and sincere managers - a rare breed, indeed. If you get time, I'd recommend reading "One Minute Manager" - a razor thin book that has lot of nice advice which you can put to work.
CE Designer
CE Designer • Sep 11, 2012
Thanks will try to get my hands on that book for sure.
I would like to pose a question to you guys. How would you deal with a worker who feels unappreciated and demotivated to work? He is good at what he does and you want to keep him.
Kaustubh Katdare
Kaustubh Katdare • Sep 11, 2012
There could be several reasons behind the worker's demotivation. Has the worker been historically demotivated and not interested in his work? Or is it any recent event that led him to his disinterest in work. What are the reasons he feels unappreciated? I think setting up a personal one-on-one meeting in private would be great in making him open up to discuss the issues he's facing.
Anoop Kumar
Anoop Kumar • Sep 12, 2012
I don't now managers receive enough credit or not but
after working under different managers I feel that employees like managers who give responsibility with power and give them some chance to grow to take decision. A little appreciation is enough to encourage the whole team.
And, yes, Listening is one the best skill of a manager😀
CE Designer
CE Designer • Sep 12, 2012
The_Big_K
There could be several reasons behind the worker's demotivation. Has the worker been historically demotivated and not interested in his work? Or is it any recent event that led him to his disinterest in work. What are the reasons he feels unappreciated? I think setting up a personal one-on-one meeting in private would be great in making him open up to discuss the issues he's facing.
He is recently envious of another worker for the wrong reasons. He is not fit to do the things that worker can do but fails to realize this. I tried a one on one with him but it would mean more coming from his supervisor or manager. As a young engineer my words may not have an overwhelming effect as theirs. But i still try.
durga ch
durga ch • Sep 12, 2012
I dont know about your team , so cant comment. but as I see - Managers tend to be a little farway from reality of practical difficulties of achieving a task. They tend to 'want' things get done without getting to compromise on anything.Given a choice, i would take my own decision without really arguing about what is appropriate to be done.
I have one easy example - there was routing mess in a network and i said we need time to fully unserstand the problem and then come to a conrete solution.
I got this reply - we cant give down time + you should not do any routing changes

as that co worker goes - i think its better to let go such people as they might end up spreading the gloominess in the team
zaveri
zaveri • Sep 12, 2012
CE Designer
Thanks will try to get my hands on that book for sure.
I would like to pose a question to you guys. How would you deal with a worker who feels unappreciated and demotivated to work? He is good at what he does and you want to keep him.
certain times , the workers get mad at their bosses (project leaders), for giving them demotivating reprimands
CE Designer
CE Designer • Sep 12, 2012
durga
I have one easy example - there was routing mess in a network and i said we need time to fully unserstand the problem and then come to a conrete solution.
I got this reply - we cant give down time
I too get this response and I am let with a challenge to accomplish a task without creating downtime and in the cheapest possible manner. The good thing is that I like challenges like this because I usually learn something new, but sometimes the cheapest way isn't the smartest way out.

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