View Feed
group-icon
Coffee Room
Discuss anything here - everything that you wish to discuss with fellow engineers.
12914 Members
Join this group to post and comment.
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 18, 2009

CE English Questions: Part - I

Here I goes...

This is an initiative taken by CNA (Crazy Nocturnal association) members - Just another group who is generally online at night too ..šŸ˜ and would love to server their duties for CE.

I am going to manage this English thread. This thread is a bit different then the other english threads, I would be posting an question only when there would be no query in this forum.

Actual idea is, you folks will ask the English questions, We (me and a few other Ce members) would love to answer your queries:

Here I goes with the first one (As there is no question available right now.)

Q1. Where and when do we use famous 'W''s?
Whoever, Whomsoever, Which, when , whomever and so on....

Answers are welcomed ...

CrazyGirl
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Jul 18, 2009
Whoever is used when a word is replaced by he or she.
Eg. He did it. He is either a genius or is completely insane.
Whoever did it is either a genius or is completely insane.

Give it to him. He deserves it.
Give it to whoever deserves it.

Whomsoever some examples of its use
Eg. To whomsoever it may concern......
She can marry whomsoever she wishes to (eg. scource: Dictionary and Thesaurus - Free Online at Your Dictionary)


Whomever
is used when a word is replaced by him or her
Eg. We will hire him. You recommend him. (source: Grammar and Punctuation | The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation)
We will hire whomever you recommend
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Jul 18, 2009
Which
- used to introduce nonessential clauses
eg. I am a bit confused regarding which topic you are discussing.

- to introduce next clause
eg. The plan, which we prepared yesterday, will be executed today.

- refers to groups or things
eg. Which of the 3 cars would you chose?

When
reefers to the time
Used as.....
- conjunction
eg. I will do it when I get the time
You may start the work now. I will tell you when to stop.

- noun
eg. He wanted to know everything about the crime. The who, the why, the when and the how.

- pronoun (interrogative) (scource: www. wiktionary.org)
eg. Since when do I need your permission?

- adverb
eg. When will the match start?
Differential
Differential • Jul 18, 2009
That was really informative. Nice !
My qn : When to use A, An and The ? Explanation with examples would be appreciated.
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Jul 18, 2009
Differential
That was really informative. Nice !
My qn : When to use A, An and The ? Explanation with examples would be appreciated.
A, An and The are articles

A/An refer to non-specific nouns
eg. I am going to watch a movie.
He ate an egg.

If a noun begins with a consonant, A is used.
eg. A man, A dog...etc
If a noun begins with a vowel, An is used
eg. An apple, An order...etc

But the use also depends on the sound of the vowel. If a vowel has a consonant sound in a word, then A is used instead of An.
eg. A university (U is pronounced as Yoo), A user..etc
Whereas in the sentence..... An unusual event occurred yesterday...the pronunciation of U is completely different.
Similarly An Umbrella, An Underwater city.....etc



The refers to specific nouns

eg. I saw the movie you were talking about.
Have you read the book.


The source of the following quoted text is Welcome to the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)
There are some specific rules for using the with geographical nouns.
Do not use the before:

  • names of most countries/territories: Italy, Mexico, Bolivia; however, the Netherlands, the Dominican Republic, the Philippines, the United States
  • names of cities, towns, or states: Seoul, Manitoba, Miami
  • names of streets: Washington Blvd., Main St.
  • names of lakes and bays: Lake Titicaca, Lake Erie except with a group of lakes like the Great Lakes
  • names of mountains: Mount Everest, Mount Fuji except with ranges of mountains like the Andes or the Rockies or unusual names like the Matterhorn
  • names of continents (Asia, Europe)
  • names of islands (Easter Island, Maui, Key West) except with island chains like the Aleutians, the Hebrides, or the Canary Islands
Do use the before:

  • names of rivers, oceans and seas: the Nile, the Pacific
  • points on the globe: the Equator, the North Pole
  • geographical areas: the Middle East, the West
  • deserts, forests, gulfs, and peninsulas: the Sahara, the Persian Gulf, the Black Forest, the Iberian Peninsula
Nice Explanations Patty!!!, Thanks.

Q3. Explain what do you mean by Verb, Noun, pronoun, adjective, adverb, conjunction, Participle and Phrase. Usage of these along with the definition would be appreciated.

-CB
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 18, 2009
Adjective
An adjective describes a noun or pronoun.
Adverb
A word like slowly, quietly, well, often etc. An adverb modifies a verb.
Conjunction
A word used to connect words, phrases and clauses (for example: and, but, if).
Interjection
An exclamation inserted into an utterance without grammatical connection (for example: oh!, ah!, ouch!, well!).
Noun
A noun is the name of an object, concept, person or place. An "uncountable noun" is something that you cannot count (for example: water, music, money).
Participle
The -ing and -ed forms of verbs. The -ing form is called the "present participle". The -ed form is called the "past participle" (for irregular verbs, this is column 3).
Phrase
A group of words not containing a subject and its verb (eg on the table, the girl in a red dress).
Preposition
A word like at, to, in, over etc. Prepositions usually come before a noun and give information about things like time, place and direction.
Pronoun
A word like I, me, you, he, him, it etc. A pronoun replaces a noun.
Verb
A word like (to) work, (to) love, (to) begin. A verb describes an action or state.
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 18, 2009
Sentence Correction:

Q4. You would have scored good marks if you had worked little harder.
(A) if you had worked little hard
(B) if you would have worked little hard
(C) if you would have worked little harder
(D) if you had worked a little harder
(E) if you will have worked a little harder

Q5. The only way for growers to salvage frozen citrus is to process them quickly into juice concentrate before they rot when warmer weather returns.
(a) to process them quickly into juice concentrate before they rot when warmer weather returns
(b) if they are quickly processed into juice concenĀ¬trate before warmer weather returns to rot them
(c) for them to be processed quickly into juice concentrate before the fruit rots when warmer weather returns
(d) if the fruit is quickly processed into juice concenĀ¬trate before they rot when warmer weather returns
(e) to have it quickly processed into juice concentrate before warmer weather returns and rots the fruit
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Jul 18, 2009
Ans4. D

Ans5. E
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 20, 2009
Correct Answers:

Q4. You would have scored good marks if you had worked little harder.
(A) if you had worked little hard
(B) if you would have worked little hard
(C) if you would have worked little harder
(D) if you had worked a little harder
(E) if you will have worked a little harder

Q5. The only way for growers to salvage frozen citrus is to process them quickly into juice concentrate before they rot when warmer weather returns.
(a) to process them quickly into juice concentrate before they rot when warmer weather returns
(b) if they are quickly processed into juice concenĀ¬trate before warmer weather returns to rot them
(c) for them to be processed quickly into juice concentrate before the fruit rots when warmer weather returns
(d) if the fruit is quickly processed into juice concenĀ¬trate before they rot when warmer weather returns
(e) to have it quickly processed into juice concentrate before warmer weather returns and rots the fruit

Also, English guru's option A is not incorrect, is it.. ??
inform
inform • Jul 20, 2009
according to me this should be the right answers
q4-D
Q5-E
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Jul 20, 2009
@Crazygirl: The option A is definitely incorrect.
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 22, 2009
Q6. Difference between Like and As with Example?

Sentence Correction:
Q7. Adult survivors of child abuse traditionally have had little or no chance that they could get symptoms recognized and treating.
(A) that they could get their symptoms recognized and treated
(B) to recognize and treat their symptoms
(C) of getting his or her symptoms recognized and treated
(D) of getting their symptoms recognized and treated
(E) of recognizing and treating symptoms
swapnakumar
swapnakumar • Jul 22, 2009
6.I like trekking.
As he was ill he couldnot attend to his duties.

7.D
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Jul 22, 2009
Along with Example, Could you please give the difference between between As and Like

Any other takers for question 7
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Aug 4, 2009
Like

adjective
having almost or exactly the same qualities, characteristics, etc.; similar; equal a cup of sugar and a like amount of flour
Rare alike
Dialectal likely
Etymology: ME lik, aphetic for ilik < OE gelic, similar, equal, lit., of the same form or shape, akin to Ger gleich < PGmc *galīka- < *ga-, prefix of uncert. meaning + *līka, body, (ON līk, Goth leik, OE lic): for IE base see lich

adverb
Informal likely like as not, he is already there
similar to; somewhat resembling she is like a bird
in a manner characteristic of; similarly to she sings like a bird
in accord with the nature of; characteristic of it's not like her to sleep late
in the mood for; desirous of to feel like sleeping
indicative or prophetic of that sounds like fun; it looks like a clear day tomorrow
as for example great dramatists like Sophocles and Shakespeare

conjunction
in the way that; as it was just like you said
as if it looks like he is late

noun
a person or thing regarded as the equal or counterpart of another or of the person or thing being discussed I've never met her like

interjection
Informal inserted into spoken sentences before or after a word, phrase, or clause, apparently without meaning or syntactic function, but possibly for emphasis it's, like, hot

-----------------
AS

adverb
to the same amount or degree; equally I'm just as happy at home
for instance; thus a card game, as bridge
when set off or related in a specified way romanticism as contrasted with classicism
Etymology: weakened form of also; ME as, ase < OE eallswa (see also); lit., wholly so, just as

conjunction
in the same amount in which or to the same degree to which it flew straight as an arrow
in the same manner that; according to the way that do as you are told
at the same time that; while she laughed as she spoke
because; since as you object, we won't go
that the consequence is the question is so obvious as to need no reply
though tall as he was, he couldn't reach it
Informal that I don't know as I should

pronoun
a fact that we are tired, as anyone can see
that: preceded by such or the same the same color as yours is
in the role, function, capacity, or sense of he poses as a friend
like the risk is as nothing compared to the gain
----------

Reference:- Your Dictionary
raj87verma88
raj87verma88 • Aug 4, 2009
I think option B for Q7
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Aug 4, 2009
Q8. Explain the following phrases:
'to talk at'
'to talk round'
'to talk back'
'to talk down'
'to talk down to'
Rajni Jain
Rajni Jain • Aug 4, 2009
Oops !! forgot to post answer:

Q7. Adult survivors of child abuse traditionally have had little or no chance that they could get symptoms recognized and treating.
(A) that they could get their symptoms recognized and treated
(B) to recognize and treat their symptoms
(C) of getting his or her symptoms recognized and treated
(D) of getting their symptoms recognized and treated
(E) of recognizing and treating symptoms

Share this content on your social channels -