Debasmita Banerjee
Debasmita Banerjee
Instrumentation
21 May 2016

New Organic Batteries To Power Up Efficiently Even In Freezing Cold

How far can a battery sustain itself in extreme conditions? This is one of those challenges for which scientific minds are putting all their efforts to find a practical solution where a battery, either that of a smartphone or a car charging source could adapt to environmental changes. Improved Lithium batteries could withstand up to 110 degrees Celsius whereas the new concept of mushroom batteries can run at full swing even at 700 degrees centigrade. These examples are the possible citations where keen interest on energy sources and especially the battery can be seen. Still, there are loop holes and the quest for upgraded energy storing devices is on and running.

Presenting a completely new concept, the Hiroshima University from Japan has come forward with their latest technology which can give power even at freezing conditions. Named as "eco battery”, the portable power source is a rechargeable, non-metallic organic battery, specifically designed to be applied in cold storages or extreme cold environments.

Rechargeable_Eco_Battery

The research team from Hiroshima University has invented an advanced technical pathway to devise organic radical batteries that could give an economical as well as a green solution to the growing problem of exhausted metal mines. Currently, the world is entangled with Lithium-ion batteries as they stand safer with respect to Lithium batteries but both are dependent on the Metal core, having a limited resource. Such technologies require a much needed change so that the rest can be saved from depletion.

According to the source, the bio-inspired battery possesses a voltage level way higher than the contemporary ones and is a simple, yet crucial modification of its predecessor, officially released in the same year. As an aid to the demanding non-renewable sources, the eco battery was optimized to perform better than their metal competitors. These new born devices are available at a cheap price and also features safe-to-handle qualities with long lasting life.

Researchers expressed that their device boasts of a high speed recharging facility which could recharge the same amount in one second, that used to be done in an hour by a conventional one. As a reason, they held chemical energy carrying process responsible for this. Furthermore, the device could make a place inside wearable gadgets as it can be moulded flexibly and could be customized to take on a transparent appearance.

The approach, “new organic radical synthesis method” taken up by Professor Yamamoto was first realized in 1985 and the current modifications have been integral to its development. The current research was published by the Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan and wasfunded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

Source: Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan | Yamamoto Group(Hiroshima Unv.)
KenJackson

KenJackson

Branch Unspecified
22 May 2016
The eco battery "is a rechargeable, non-metallic organic battery ..."

What does that mean? Does it just mean that the active elements contain carbon? Or are they using amino acids? Are they using proteins from an animal? Can we have a hit of what chemical reaction is involved?

"... has invented an advanced technical pathway to devise organic radical batteries ..."

I assume that means organic-radical batteries, not organic radical-batteries.

"... that could give an economical as well as a green solution to the growing problem of exhausted metal mines."

It's not clean, but it sounds like they're claiming lithium is becoming scarce. I don't know if that's the case, but I understand Afghanistan has a huge wealth of lithium reserves. If that country could solve its psychotic jihad problem they could all become wealthy selling lithium.
Debasmita Banerjee

Debasmita Banerjee

Instrumentation
22 May 2016
Good to hear from you Sir, Kenneth.

At first, I would like to say that I am completely a newbie to chemical biology and my expertise is no way near to this branch, however being an enthusiast I greatly emphasize on working with things I do not know. My answer might falter and I do not have the best background to back up all my points with solid evidence (statistics or detailed sources). However, I would try to sum it up from my general knowledge and some sources which could only elaborate in popular approach.

“What does that mean? Does it just mean that the active elements contain carbon? Or are they using amino acids? Are they using proteins from an animal? Can we have a hit of what chemical reaction is involved?”- In reference to "…is a rechargeable, non-metallic organic battery…"

The answer to that will be Organic Radical Polymers in place of Lithium source. As the name suggests, Organic Radical Polymers possess stable Radicals which are highly reactive to its counter parts and produce rapid charging (Already mentioned in the VoiCE post) much faster than Li-ion batteries. Now, if we compare an ORB system with Li-ion battery system we would not find much difference in the process except that the element itself is changed. Both the systems have a cathode and anode and an electrolytic solution on which the system is immersed. But only thing is that, the reaction happens centering Organic radical compounds, instead of lithionated metal oxide.

(first answer has not been complete yet, but there is a requirement to explain the second one now)

We are calling it an organic radical battery, because the mechanism involves exchange of free radicals of Organic compounds. So if we call it organic radical-battery then I think it will sound proper. Now, going back to the point, Redox reaction involves radicals to generate electrochemical potential for which the charge generates. One of the most studied examples of such organic radical reaction is (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl, commonly dubbed as TEMPO, a nitroxide radical. When it is oxidized it produced oxammonium cation and it reduces to a hydroxylamine anion. In case of ORBs the positive electrode uses nitroxide-oxammonium in cycles from charging to discharging, which is the only part different from Li-ion battery.

“It's not clean, but it sounds like they're claiming lithium is becoming scarce. I don't know if that's the case, but I understand Afghanistan has a huge wealth of lithium reserves. If that country could solve its psychotic jihad problem they could all become wealthy selling lithium”-in reference to "... that could give an economical as well as a green solution to the growing problem of exhausted metal mines."

The subject of Lithium exhaustion is an interesting one and there have been a lot of conflicting reports. According to a 2011 report by the University of Michigan and Ford, the present Lithium resources will be able to meet global demands till at least the year 2100. A 2014 finding however suggest that the demand for Li was growing by 12% every year, a figure which exceeds the projected availability by 25%. Most experts however agree on the fact that the price of Li will continue to rise until a more efficient mode of extraction is discovered, that will boost the production.

On this ground I have stated the related contents of my article.
KenJackson

KenJackson

Branch Unspecified
23 May 2016
Thank you for the explanation, Debasmita.

BTW, I wrote "It's not clean, ..." but I meant "It's not clear, ...", meaning I wasn't sure if that's what the post meant. You've confirmed it.

Debasmita Banerjee
Sir, Kenneth
There actually is a knighted Sir Ken Jackson in Great Britain. But I'm not him.

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