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N.Gowtham Raj
N.Gowtham Raj • Aug 15, 2013

Design a system that that can detect leakage of an industrial valve?

Dear CEans,

A little background:

I work for Industrial Valves Mfg firm. We make industrial valves of bigger sizes & larger pressures(up to 23000 psi) , so it is a part of the process that we test the valve for LEAK TIGHTNESS.

That is we pressurize the valve in a Pressure Test Stand & check for leakage manually.

Demerits are as follows

1. Because of the size & pressure, it becomes difficult to check manually.
2. False conclusions
3. Safety threat to work men
4. No permanent record

To overcome the above, i am working to design a system.

Few bullet points on the macro idea

1. 4 Cameras to capture all the sides of a valve.
2. Connected to a PC which can record the video being captured for testing time(10 mins approx)
3. A software that can highlight the leakage if any.

Friends, need your help to proceed & ideas to materialize the same.

Also please comment on the feasibility of the above idea & pls post the details of the similar systems you may have come across already.
Nayan Goenka
Nayan Goenka • Aug 15, 2013
I think what type of software you are demanding is good and needed in your field. But there are somethings you are missing.

Sensors will be more efficient in detecting your Leaks. Cameras won't be that efficient.
on my views, maybe I am wrong, Making a software for that isn't that necessary. Why don't you isolate the valve testing region and put a pressure sensor in that chamber can tell you if the pressure there has increased, That means If there is any leakage can be judged. I may be wrong but I think this should work.
A nice Idea
N.Gowtham Raj
Dear CEans,

A little background:

I work for Industrial Valves Mfg firm. We make industrial valves of bigger sizes & larger pressures(up to 23000 psi) , so it is a part of the process that we test the valve for LEAK TIGHTNESS.

That is we pressurize the valve in a Pressure Test Stand & check for leakage manually.

Demerits are as follows

1. Because of the size & pressure, it becomes difficult to check manually.
2. False conclusions
3. Safety threat to work men
4. No permanent record

To overcome the above, i am working to design a system.

Few bullet points on the macro idea

1. 4 Cameras to capture all the sides of a valve.
2. Connected to a PC which can record the video being captured for testing time(10 mins approx)
3. A software that can highlight the leakage if any.

Friends, need your help to proceed & ideas to materialize the same.

Also please comment on the feasibility of the above idea & pls post the details of the similar systems you may have come across already.
A nice Idea sir.You can use thermal sensors which can help in detecting the variation in temperature.As if there is any leakage I assume there will be a high pressure difference in the near area so as temperature and this would give you a rough idea on leakage
Tagging experts to give better idea on this topic
A.V.Ramani
Conqueror
Abhishek Rawal
Nayan Goenka
Nayan Goenka
Nayan Goenka • Aug 15, 2013
CSK AUTO
Tagging experts to give better idea on this topic
A.V.Ramani
Conqueror
Abhishek Rawal
Nayan Goenka

I already gave my solution. I don't think there is a need to build a dedicated software for that synced with cameras. Pressure Sensors would do behind an isolated chambers
Have you considered ultrasonic leak detection? It may be suitable for leaks more than some minimum rate. But it is a far more easy and forgiving process. Please see here:

https://www.maintenanceworld.com/Articles/pem-mag/Using-ultrasound-technology.html
Divya Nair
Divya Nair • Aug 24, 2013
@Nayan Goenka sir where would be the pressure sensor be placed????? I guess, would the pressure sensor could sustain in such high pressure????
If the testing is at the manufacturing plant, it is best to use compressed air and an ultrasonic detector on the outlet. This will not contaminate the inside, costs very little and very simple to use.
Even at 100 psi pressure (shop compressed air will be about this) the leakage rate will be as high as 6% of the leak of air at 23000 psi.
Nayan Goenka
Nayan Goenka • Aug 24, 2013
divya nair
@Nayan Goenka sir where would be the pressure sensor be placed????? I guess, would the pressure sensor could sustain in such high pressure????
Please dont call me sir. On the point, pressure sensors can be engineered to sustain ultra high pressure too. So that won't be the issue. When we are testing leakage, we need to record slight change inside the testing chamber.
N.Gowtham Raj
N.Gowtham Raj • Aug 25, 2013
A.V.Ramani
Have you considered ultrasonic leak detection? It may be suitable for leaks more than some minimum rate. But it is a far more easy and forgiving process. Please see here:

https://www.maintenanceworld.com/Articles/pem-mag/Using-ultrasound-technology.html


Sorry for the delay guys.... ideas suggested are simply superb....
Ramani sir's, the above quoted article was very much informative...

@Nayan Goenka - Dude, the valves are bulkier, that is more than 5 tonnes, building an enclosed pressure chamber is not possible practically considering the material handling of the valves.

@CSK AUTO - Dude, Since it is not a closed chamber, the minute differences in temperature cannot be detected i suppose.

Great Ideas are triggering out... More please...
N.Gowtham Raj
N.Gowtham Raj • Sep 5, 2013
Guys... Please suggest me on how to proceed.....
Divya Nair
Divya Nair • Sep 7, 2013
I guess can't the leakage from valve could be detected via whistle or alarm system?
Void Runner
Void Runner • Apr 8, 2014
It depends on whether you want to detect a fluid leak or a gas leak. I'd recommend having appropriate sensors installed (gas detectors/pressure sensors) and monitoring them through SCADA for surges in electrical output. An alternative is to run a timed helium leak detection test using a probe on regular intervals and measure the output of that probe. Either way you'd need to do a lot of trial and error to see what works best for you.

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