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Chaitali Sumita
Chaitali Sumita • Sep 3, 2009

"Crazy capacitive world": Difference between inductor and capacitor

hiiiii guyzzzzzzzz........


actually i believe in making funda clear first and then proceed further...

so i was curious to know

What is the difference between an "inductor" and a "capacitor" & what is the difference between different types of capacitors such as mica capacitors,gangue capacitors,etc...??๐Ÿ˜•
ashutoshglamour
ashutoshglamour • Sep 3, 2009
The circuit containing inductor is always lagging because the current take some time to pass through the coil while the circuit containing capacitance is always leading.
ashutoshglamour
ashutoshglamour • Sep 3, 2009
The different capacitance such as mica,gangue are named on it's material which is used for making that capacitance.
Dhruti
Dhruti • Sep 3, 2009
capacitor is used to hold charge(small amount of charge) for a short time.. this charge can be some kind of information i dunno much about inductors..
Muffy
Muffy • Sep 3, 2009
Hi
A capacitor is a circuit component designed to store electrical charge. If you connect a dc voltage source to a capacitor, for example, the capacitor will โ€œchargeโ€ to the voltage of the source. If you then disconnect the source, the capacitor will remain charged, i.e., its voltage will remain constant at the value to which it had risen while connected to the source (assuming no leakage). Because of this tendency to hold voltage, a capacitor opposes changes in voltage.

On the other hand the inductor is designed to store a magnetic field (like any current carrying conductor). If you connect a dc source to it a current flows through the inductor (depending on the resistance of the coil) , but this current is initially opposed by the inductor . Similarly when to dc source is removed the current tends to decay, but the inductor tries maintain the current by inducing a voltage across its terminal.This is caused due to the decay of the magnetic field ,which was set up when there was a current in the circuit while the dc source was still available. Thus the inductor tends to oppose any change in current through it.

Hope this helps. ๐Ÿ˜€

Reference: " Circuit Analysis -Principles and Applications" by Allan H. Robbins & Wilhelm C. Miller
Eng.Binomairah
Eng.Binomairah • Sep 5, 2009
Muffy
Hi
A capacitor is a circuit component designed to store electrical charge. If you connect a dc voltage source to a capacitor, for example, the capacitor will โ€œchargeโ€ to the voltage of the source. If you then disconnect the source, the capacitor will remain charged, i.e., its voltage will remain constant at the value to which it had risen while connected to the source (assuming no leakage). Because of this tendency to hold voltage, a capacitor opposes changes in voltage.

On the other hand the inductor is designed to store a magnetic field (like any current carrying conductor). If you connect a dc source to it a current flows through the inductor (depending on the resistance of the coil) , but this current is initially opposed by the inductor . Similarly when to dc source is removed the current tends to decay, but the inductor tries maintain the current by inducing a voltage across its terminal.This is caused due to the decay of the magnetic field ,which was set up when there was a current in the circuit while the dc source was still available. Thus the inductor tends to oppose any change in current through it.

Hope this helps. ๐Ÿ˜€

Reference: " Circuit Analysis -Principles and Applications" by Allan H. Robbins & Wilhelm C. Miller
Thanks ...

interesting answer ๐Ÿ˜Ž

now can i ask a question ?

what is the application of the inductor , i mean what is the advantage of

it when we are going to design a circuit ?
chiru
chiru • Sep 5, 2009
A capacitor allows a.c. voltage and a bad material to pass d.c where an inductor is good for d.c. voltage
AMITBOSE
AMITBOSE • Sep 5, 2009
in capacitor power factor is always leading but in inductor power factor always lag behind.
skipper
skipper • Sep 5, 2009
Capacitance and inductance are inverses, but with different integrals in VI.

Think about how work is done transporting a charge, as current. The inductor, with inductance, integrates this as L*dI/dt, a capacitor as 1/C*dV/dt; one is a voltage - the inductor induced a magnetic field opposing the forward current, which is the impedance you see with AC, the other is a current because the "static" charge tries to move to a lower potential, when it sees an impedance there's a voltage.
electronspeed
electronspeed • Sep 6, 2009
If you are going for designing an electronic circuit, then capacitor finds application in
-blocking dc,
-bypassing a resistor,as at high frequency it offers negligible reactance
-ac coupling of 2 ckts.
At the same time inductors with energy storing ability & wave generation are used RF oscillator design.
They are also used in transformer coupling.

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