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Rishabh1234
Rishabh1234 • Mar 17, 2015

Aircrafts flying upside down

what type of configurational changes are done on the wings of an aircraft to make it able to fly upside down.I mean how a normally flying plane gets inverted without any loss of control.Also since not all the planes can be flown upside down, what is so special about the wings of the aircrafts that can fly in both configurations.
Note- i know about the limitation of fuel and oil supply in the inverted position.Lets ignore it for a moment and talk everything in terms of lift and drag force.
TAMIL AZHAGAR
TAMIL AZHAGAR • Mar 17, 2015
SYMMETRICAL WINGS
Most airfoils are cambered, or curved, on top but flat on the bottom. As a result, they fly better upright than inverted. Symmetrical airfoils, which have the same curvature on both surfaces, perform exactly the same upright or inverted, and so are favored by aerobatic pilots. In order to fly at all, however, a symmetrical airfoil must be positioned at a slight positive angle—leading edge high—with respect to the flight path; otherwise the airflow around the upper and lower surfaces would be the same, and no lift would be created.

Read more: https://www.airspacemag.com/flight-today/how-things-work-flying-upside-down-27746739/#ixzz3UebKSiQe
Mark mailu
Mark mailu • Mar 17, 2015
ASymmetrical wings:

The aerofoil aerofoil tends to be cambered on the upper camber and almost flat on the lower
camber.The air flows on the upper camber of the wing at high velosity and
vice versa to the lower camber.The upper camber experiences low pressure than the lower camber which has low velosity and has high pressure .this high pressure generates lift.in a case of upside down flying the lift is generated downward.this makes the aircraft move downward..this is negative lift.
Rishabh1234
Rishabh1234 • Mar 18, 2015
Tamilazhagan
SYMMETRICAL WINGS
Most airfoils are cambered, or curved, on top but flat on the bottom. As a result, they fly better upright than inverted. Symmetrical airfoils, which have the same curvature on both surfaces, perform exactly the same upright or inverted, and so are favored by aerobatic pilots. In order to fly at all, however, a symmetrical airfoil must be positioned at a slight positive angle—leading edge high—with respect to the flight path; otherwise the airflow around the upper and lower surfaces would be the same, and no lift would be created.

Read more: https://www.airspacemag.com/flight-today/how-things-work-flying-upside-down-27746739/#ixzz3UebKSiQe
Doesn't the use of symmetrical wings and then giving a positive angle will lead to less lift as comparision to the one side flat wing.also,i think drag would also be increased in this case.
Mark mailu
Mark mailu • Mar 18, 2015
Rishabh1234quoted [QUOTE="Rishabh1234
Doesn't the use of symmetrical wings and then giving a positive angle will lead to less lift as comparision to the one side flat wing.also,i think drag would also be increased in this case.
From which book have you quoted.
t: 339937, member: 188410"]Doesn't the use of symmetrical wings and then giving a positive angle will lead to less lift as comparision to the one side flat wing.also,i think drag would also be increased in this case.[/QUOTE]
Which book jave ou quotd
Rishabh1234
Rishabh1234 • Mar 18, 2015
i have not quoted it from any books. This is my understanding and curiosity to discuss this topic
Mark mailu
Mark mailu • Mar 20, 2015
I got you.

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