Deepak Gopalakrishnan
Deepak Gopalakrishnan
Branch Unspecified
03 Apr 2012

Absolute Zero: Interest Levels in Engineering Curve

Our interest levels in engineering don't remain constant. From dreams of finding new proprietary methods of producing aldehydes and oil exploration to a steady stream of CAT books while learning rote answers to give the software interview guys, it's a trip.

Some of us slog it out and become true engineers. Salute to you, chaps!
The rest of us can refer this handy-dandy chart.

AZ10
03 Apr 2012
I think I was always interested in Engineering 😨
03 Apr 2012
Final year, but still at the pH=7 stage! 😕
ISHAN TOPRE

ISHAN TOPRE

Branch Unspecified
03 Apr 2012
The curve is a little different for me. It was "Who cares? the worst decision ever" in III year. Now my interest has peaked!
Good comics chuckofalltrades 👍
Ankita Katdare

Ankita Katdare

Computer Science
03 Apr 2012
😁 Frankly, I am so confused that I have no idea where do I plot my interest level in that chart.
Deepak Gopalakrishnan

Deepak Gopalakrishnan

Branch Unspecified
04 Apr 2012
It's too bad that interest levels in engineering have to dip. To my mind, it's because of two reasons:

1. Lack of clarity when applying: I've seen a lot of people, and I'm one of them, who is unaware about career choices and just goes along with engineering, and decide by their 3rd year what they really want to do.

2. The pedagogy itself: Like much of our school education, the emphasis seems to be on getting the subjects done with (faculty) and cramming 2 days before the exams to pass the exams (students). How much learning is imparted and how much is taken in? Zilch.

What can be done for this to change?

1. Have a clearer career choice: even if this means debating with your parents who want you to be an engineer. The loss of sheen of IT companies should help in the long term in this regard (I'm not even getting into how IT has killed traditional engineering interest... Another comic for that).

2. More industry exposure: In a BSchool, there is so much emphasis on interacting with industry. Not just through the internship program. It's important students get out there in the world and see for themselves what engineering actually is - vats, drums, floor people, machines and NOT diagrams. Which brings me to my last point...

3. Kill rote studying: The emphasis placed on rote studying in higher education is shocking. Who has time for concepts when all one can think of is mugging formulae? What, you think your supervisor is going to let you use the Darcy-Weishbach equation from memory while handling a mechanical flow worth crores? Give me a break, get real. In this age of technology and references, engineering should learn to embrace rather than to use archaic methods. Get students out for more internships. Let them see industry, and do things hands-on. These are the most exciting parts of engineering, not faking values in the lab so that your graph is of the correct shape.

Sorry for a long post!

Chuck
Sahithi Pallavi

Sahithi Pallavi

Computer Science
04 Apr 2012
My levels and the chart levels looks completely differs 😕 Anyway Nice work, chuck 👍

And chuckofalltrades - You can also mention the options like 'Before Coming to CE' and 'After Coming to CE' in the TIMELINE. Or for Normal Engineers and Crazy Engineers 😁 😛
Saandeep Sreerambatla

Saandeep Sreerambatla

Branch Unspecified
04 Apr 2012
Nice comic 😀 I dont fall into any section up there 😀
ISHAN TOPRE

ISHAN TOPRE

Branch Unspecified
04 Apr 2012
English-Scared
Nice comic 😀 I dont fall into any section up there 😀
Then you are either God or Devil 😁

chuckofalltrades Concepts are important. While people explain mugged up definitions and formulae. Me and my friends, make it a point to explain answers in Hindi/ Marathi to external examiner. I had my Viva and I fared well in it. That is because I was able to explain answers with PEN, PAPER and in my FLUENT MOTHER TONGUE. 😀
Gurjap

Gurjap

Branch Unspecified
04 Apr 2012
Brilliant post, Chuck.
Harshad Italiya

Harshad Italiya

Electronics and Communication
05 Apr 2012
One of my classmate is now in diamond business, Seems you have plotted his chart. 😛
circularsquare

circularsquare

Branch Unspecified
06 Apr 2012
chuckofalltrades
It's too bad that interest levels in engineering have to dip. To my mind, it's because of two reasons:

1. Lack of clarity when applying: I've seen a lot of people, and I'm one of them, who is unaware about career choices and just goes along with engineering, and decide by their 3rd year what they really want to do.
Since past 100 -150 years we Indians are used to just going with the flow when it comes to career choices.

In the days of our grandfathers everyone applied for post office jobs.
Then in the age of our uncles everyone wished to get a job in a nationalised bank.
In the days of our fathers everyone started aiming for Engineering.
Now the buzzword is MBA.
Mr.Don

Mr.Don

Branch Unspecified
06 Apr 2012
😁...Hmm nice post Chuck! - 😨 What!?? 😡 Mine is a cosine wave.

@Chuck you must consider everyone! 😐
zaveri

zaveri

Branch Unspecified
07 Apr 2012
true to an extent.........but once you have done a project whose result is a robust piece of machinery, then the curve rises back to"great to be a b.tech" point
ISHAN TOPRE

ISHAN TOPRE

Branch Unspecified
07 Apr 2012
Mr.Don
😁...Hmm nice post Chuck! - 😨 What!?? 😡 Mine is a cosine wave.

@Chuck you must consider everyone! 😐
He wants to draw a generalized graph. Imagine if a graph for everyone is drawn, how would it look? 😁
Mr.Don

Mr.Don

Branch Unspecified
08 Apr 2012
Issue
He wants to draw a generalized graph. Imagine if a graph for everyone is drawn, how would it look? 😁
hmm, hard and odd but if it's - draw it in 9-D 😁 view. 😁
Ankita Katdare

Ankita Katdare

Computer Science
10 Apr 2012
The graph reminds us that an engineering degree holding fresher has lost his interest in engineering when he needs his passion the most. 👎
What a misery.

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